Webinar: Cloud Computing: First Steps to Jumpstart Your Cloud Project 2019-03-14

Webinar: Cloud Computing: First Steps to Jumpstart Your Cloud Project 2019-03-14


Sima: Hi everyone. Thank you so much
for joining us for our webinar today, Cloud Computing: First Steps
to Jumpstart Your Cloud Project. Before we get started, I just want
to go over a few housekeeping items. So all callers will be muted. If
you lose your Internet connection, try reconnecting using the
link that was emailed to you. If you have to drop off early, or if
you want to watch the webinar again, we will be hosting the
webinar on our website at
techsoup.org/community/events-webinars. We will also be sending out
an email with the presentation, the recording, and any relevant links. If you are on social media feel
free to tweet at us @TechSoup using #tswebinars. But like I said
earlier, we will be using the chat box that you see on the left-hand side of
your screen to take questions today. So just a little bit about TechSoup.
We are located in 236 countries and territories. We work with over a
million nonprofits around the world. And we work with technology companies
like Adobe, Intuit, Microsoft, Symantec, Amazon Web Services, and several
others to make our mission possible. We also offer several different,
outside of hardware and software, we also offer training, technology
services. We have a community of our forums, and our blogs, and our social media
where we post a lot of tips and tricks and things like that. So if you
are interested check out our website at TechSoup.org. And then if you are also interested
in seeing what product donations are available to your
organization, you can visit techsoup.org/get-product-donations And today we are going to specifically
be focused on Amazon Web Services. So if you are interested in
finding out what you can get through Amazon Web Services,
you can visit the URL, and we will be sending
this out in the chat also. So I just want to make sure
that everyone can hear me okay. So if you guys don’t mind just typing
in where you’re calling in from, and I’ll read a few of them out just to
make sure that my sound is working okay. All right so we have Arizona, California,
Texas, Michigan, Homer, Alaska, nice, Brooksville, Florida, New York, Alabama.
Okay, so we have people calling in from all over the country. All right, so it seems like
you guys can hear me okay. So I’m going to go ahead and make
introductions. So my name is Sima Thakkar. I am the Content
Manager here at TechSoup. We have three presenters today, so I’m
going to go ahead and introduce all of them. So we have Jamin Gluck, and
he is the nonprofit manager for Amazon Web Services. He has been
working with technology for nonprofits for the past three years, and
he currently is a program manager on the AWS nonprofits
team enabling organizations of all sizes to evolve mission
operations through cloud technology. We also have Arif Hoque. Arif
is a solutions architect focused on providing technical guidance
to nonprofits big and small. He’s passionate about
working with nonprofits and helping them use technology
to achieve their mission. And we also have Mike Coleman who is
a former sys-admin turned evangelist. Mike works at AWS as a
developer advocate focused on getting people started in
the cloud. Prior to joining AWS he worked as an evangelist at Docker.
Before that he held various positions at Docker, VMware, Intel, and
Microsoft. In his spare time, he serves on the board of a local
nonprofit in his hometown of Portland. So I’m going to go ahead
and pass it off to Jamin now. Jamin: Thank you so much Sima,
and hello TechSoup audience. It is a pleasure to be connected
with you, and I’m so happy to be able to be speaking
about how cloud technology and specifically cloud computing can help
your organization achieve its mission. Right here I want to just
take maybe a couple seconds to read that kind of caption there. The
question should no longer be “if cloud,” rather it should be “how do we get
started and what project is first?” I want to point out that we are
going through a shift in technology that is unlike any
other in our lifetime, and it is happening at a startling pace, much faster than really
anybody can anticipate. So the technology is here but
it’s able to help your organization achieve its mission. And this
webinar is meant to help inform you to then inform your organization
of the ways that we can leverage this technology. So we
hope you leave this webinar with a bit more of an
understanding of the cloud, a sense for how you can
actually get started, and the motivation to go back
to your team and educate them about the way that the cloud
can help your organization achieve its mission. So again,
thank you Sima for the introduction. Again my name is Jimmy, Jam, Jamin
coming at you live from Herndon, Virginia, And I have colleagues
here Arif and Mike. I also want to take a moment just
to point out here at the bottom that there is an email address.
If there’s ever a question that you have that for
whatever reason isn’t answered during this webinar, you
can absolutely email us, not only during the webinar, but any
time. And this goes directly to me and my team and we are able to
help you answer those questions. So without further ado, in terms
of what we will be discussing today, the first thing is your questions.
Here at Amazon Web Services we really work from the customer
backwards. So it’s imperative that we hear the feedback from
those that are on this line about what you are understanding,
what you might have questions on, what you understand, but
want more information on. So please, please, please certainly
speak up. We will have a Q&A at the end of this webinar, but at the
same time, the chat box is still open, so please do speak up and ask questions. Additionally, we will be reviewing
the benefits of cloud computing. We understand that not everyone
on the line today is fully aware of what the cloud is and how it
can benefit your organization. So we will definitely take
some time to discuss that. We will briefly feature a couple of
nonprofits that are successfully leveraging the cloud to achieve their mission. And
then we will kind of get into the meat and potatoes of this webinar,
allow you guys to start putting some hands on keyboards, and actually
starting to leverage the cloud in an easy and yet effective way
by launching a WordPress site. So before we get started, let’s get
a sense for who we have on the line. I know we all like little pop
quizzes. So does your organization have a technical team? No pressure
here. It just gives us a better sense of the audience that
we are speaking with. We will give it about 25 seconds. Okay, so let’s skip to some
results here. And what do we got? A large percentage is suggesting no. Not a problem, this
webinar is right for you. So you’ve shown up at the right place. Additionally, for those of you who do
have a technical team, great as well. This webinar will be able to speak to
both those that have technical teams, as well as those that don’t. Next question here and then
will jump right into things. How familiar are you with the
Amazon Web Services or AWS? We will give it about
10 or 15 more seconds. Excellent, I will go ahead and skip to
results. Thank you to those who participated. All right, so a majority, nearly
half don’t know what AWS is. Excellent, good for you for
showing up to learn new things. You’re absolutely in the right place.
And then it seems like we have people who have had a sense for what AWS is, as well as those who are
currently running workloads on AWS. So again, this webinar is built out
from start to finish to be able to speak to those who have no
idea, as well as those who are ready to get their hands
on keyboards. So thank you so much. We’re just going to
jump right into things. Let’s talk about some
cloud fundamentals. First things first is
what is cloud computing? Well, cloud computing in a short
definition is the on-demand delivery of IT resource applications via the
Internet with pay-as-you-go pricing. Okay, but what exactly does
that mean? Very fair question. So I went ahead and split this
up into three different parts. The first one is on-demand delivery.
What does on-demand delivery mean? Well on-demand delivery means that
you don’t have to wait for anything, for example, hardware and servers to
arrive for you to start your projects. Just in a matter of seconds you
can have the technology you need at your fingertips with the
cloud with Amazon Web Services as soon as you need it, it is there.
Another name for this is agility. AWS lets customers quickly spin
up resources as they need them. This means that our customers
can very quickly develop and rollout new applications,
and it means teams can experiment and innovate more
quickly and frequently. Another thing that’s really
great about leveraging the cloud for its on-demand component is
that if something is not working you can scrap that idea and move on
quickly without having to purchase those tangible hard costs. Right, so
that’s what on demand delivery means. But what does IT resource
applications via the Internet mean? So IT resource applications,
for the sake of this conversation is just another name for all things
Internet. Everything from desktop applications that we are used to seeing on
our laptop, to database storage perhaps for your donors or for your
pictures or videos from a banquet or gala, and all the way to artificial intelligence,
and things like facial recognition. That’s what we are talking about
when we are talking about IT resources that are delivered to our
customers on-demand via the cloud. So then what does it mean
with pay-as-you-go pricing? Well pay-as-you-go pricing means you
no longer have to purchase and invest in capital costs. No
more upfront sunken cost like racking and stacking servers
to upkeep your local network. Racking and stacking servers
essentially means building and maintaining your own data
warehouse for your organization’s needs. So rather, you pay only for
the individual services you need for as long as you need them. And
without required long-term contract or complex licensing. AWS pricing is
similar to how you pay for utilities like water and electricity. You only
pay for the services you consume. And once you stop using them,
there are no additional cost or termination fees. So for an
audience like this it sounds like – that largely doesn’t have IT teams
or much understanding of the cloud before this webinar – what AWS will
allow for you to do is largely experiment with low risk, low upfront cost and
the opportunity to test and innovate without having to invest
too much in capital costs. So I’m going to pass the microphone
now over to my colleague Arif. But if you don’t understand
something with the definition of what is cloud computing?
Please type it into the text box in the bottom left, and we can
get to those questions later. Arif? Arif: Hello everybody. So on this
slide we have a picture of a generator. So I want to take you back
in time to the early 1900s when a family wanted to have
electricity enter their homes they actually had to go and
provision, purchase a generator. They had to order it, wait for it to
come. They had to install it, provision it, maintain it, and fuel the generator.
When the generator broke down, they had to wait for repairs. So this
is kind of like a self-service model of installing and provisioning
electricity in your homes. Today we have thankfully, utility
companies that are giving us and providing electricity for us.
We don’t have to provision anything. We don’t have to worry about any
of the installations or repairs. We just pay for what we use.
When we flip the switch to on, we expect it to turn on. So
similarly, the era of provisioning your own servers and resources
in your IT closet or datacenter, and having to maintain it have
backups and like tape drives, maintaining all those resources,
and paying an upfront cost for all those capital expenses
that is kind of going – we are in a new era where we are able
to take advantage of cloud services. So that when we flip the switch, we
can expect the service to turn on, and we would only pay for what we use. So like Jamin mentioned, it’s
not about do I use the cloud? It’s more about how do I start using it,
and what applications do I start put on it? This is really the future
where you can achieve agility, and all these other benefits which
Jamin will go over in the next slide. Jamin: Excellent, thanks so much
Arif. If you guys are like me, then these types of
analogies are super helpful. Again, it is on-demand much
like the other types of resources like electricity that we use. So
now that we have a pretty solid fundamental understanding of what is the
cloud, we are about to go into a little bit of what are the benefits of a cloud. We are not going to review all of
these, but I think this picture, this slide gives a good sense
of the overall vast potential that the cloud has to
offer your organization. The first benefit that we
will discuss is elasticity in that your organization no
longer has to guess capacity. When I think about capacity,
I think about my smart phone and how sometimes it will run slowly when
I try to use too many apps at one time. I’m sure that this experience is
relatable to some of those on the line. So when this is happening, it’s that
I’m trying to use more compute power than available capacity. But with the
cloud, the growth of the compute capacity can happen automatically. Customers
used to, as you can see in this slide, buy for peak and over provision to
ensure that they had enough capacity to handle their business operations
at the peak level of activity. Now with the cloud they can
provision the amount of resources that they actually need, knowing
they can instantly scale up or down along with their needs for the
business which also reduces the cost and improves the customer’s ability
to meet their users’ demands. So in a traditional center-based model
of IT, once infrastructure is deployed it typically runs whether it’s needed
or not. It’s being unused or used, because you are sitting on that
infrastructure. All of the capacity is paid for regardless of how
much is actually getting used. But in the cloud and working with
AWS, this is something that AWS can provide your organization,
resources like compute power are elastic, meaning they can instantly grow
or shrink to match the requirements of a specific application. So again,
like the example that I just used with the smart phone, imagine
if your phone’s compute capacity could increase when you had multiple
apps open, but then shrink again when you are only using
maybe your text messages. Elasticity allows you to
match the supply of resources to your organization has which costs
money to your organization’s demands. Because cloud resources
are paid for based on usage, matching needs to utilization is
critical for cost optimization. Arif: I wanted to talk about this
theoretical nonprofit, nonprofit X. So imagine this is their actual
traffic, the orange lines with peaks and the valleys. As you can see
towards the end of the months there’s a huge peak in traffic. So you can
imagine that would be like Giving Tuesday. So at the top you see
“Provisioned compute capacity”. So this nonprofit, they
are running on premises and just to be able to match
the load on Giving Tuesday, they actually have to provision their
servers and all of their resources, expend all of that capital expense all
upfront, and keep it running for the year, because it’s not like, “Hey, I only
use this much. I’m going to shrink,” because they’re running on premise.
So to illustrate it further, the actual traffic for the year, they
only need 24% of what they had provisioned, and then 76% goes unused. And that’s where the cloud comes
in. Having autoscaling enabled on your applications, and using
horizontal scaling for your servers allows you to match your
capacity and your resources to match your demand. So there are a
number of ways to match your traffic to your resources such as network
traffic, or kind of visitor count, and you can grow and shrink
as demand grows and shrinks. So you can imagine this would save
a nonprofit huge amounts of money. It would remove a lot of overhead
on maintaining these servers, so your staff can focus on tasks
that drive your organization forward. Jamin: Excellent, thanks so much Arif.
And just to kind of hit that message home one more time, I think it’s really,
really relevant to the nonprofit space when we think about our
holiday giving times. Let’s think right, what is the traffic
like on your organization’s website on December 24 versus let’s say June 24? And understanding that that discrepancy
between the amount of traffic, I think does a really good job of
providing color to this image here. And if it weren’t for the elasticity
of cloud computing from AWS, then you would have to essentially
pay for the compute power. Again, that compute power is like the
phone being able to handle a lot of apps open at once, but you would have to
be able to handle that compute power throughout the entire year to meet
the demand for the December 24, when in fact on June 24 you don’t
even need a fraction of that amount. So this is a really good example
when thinking about your donor season and how the cloud can help
support that increase in demand. So in addition to elasticity, we know
that cost savings are so important to really all organizations,
especially those that are nonprofits. So if you look at how people end up
moving to the cloud, almost always, the conversation starter ends
up being, you guessed it, cost. So unless you are in the
business of building data centers, and working with servers and hardware
you probably spent too much time and money doing just that. AWS allows
customers to trade capital expenses for variable expenses, paying
for IT as they consume it, not upfront and with no sunken cost.
And the variable expense is much lower with AWS and other cloud
providers than what consumers can do for themselves because
of AWS’s economies of scale. So when using the cloud, you no longer
need to dedicate valuable resources to building costly infrastructure,
including purchasing servers, and software, and licensing,
and leasing facilities, and maintaining that hardware.
Instead, you can better utilize those resources to put them towards things
that differentiate your organization. We talk about the
undifferentiated heavy lifting, and that is exactly what we are speaking
about. It’s that upfront purchasing of that hardware that every
organization has to do. It’s undifferentiating for your organization.
But when you can relieve yourself from that undifferentiated heavy lifting,
you then have the financial resources to invest in the things that are
differentiating, and that can distinguish your organization from
another organization. A great way to think about this as well, is
that you can better utilize your IT staff, rather than having them work on things
like servers and maintaining data centers. Instead you can empower them to be
innovative and work on new projects, and take risks. Because like we
discussed earlier, even if those projects don’t pan out the way you thought they
would, there’s no lost sunken costs. All AWS servers are available
on demand and require no long-term contracts and have
no complex licensing dependencies. Pay-as-you-go pricing allows you to
easily adopt to changing business needs without over committing budgets.
With a pay-as-you-go model you can adapt your business depending
on the need and not on forecasts reducing the risks of over
provisioning or missing capacity. Arif, do you want to speak a little
bit about reserved instances as well? Arif: Yes, sure that is very relevant. So when you do have workloads that
you know you want to keep running, rather than running them on
demand at the on-demand rate, you can actually lock them in up to
40% to 75% lower than the on-demand rate by committing to using them for a year. So this is perfect for workloads
such as your WordPress site, or any kind of Drupal application,
or Web server you are running on AWS. If you know it’s going to be running
for the year, and you are happy with it, you can do a no upfront commitment
and achieve up to 40% to 75% just depending upon duration
and terms of the contract. So that’s a really great way for a
nonprofit whose sure of running their website on that specific instance. They would be
able to save a really large amount of money. Jamin: Excellent, thanks so much. It
reminds me as well, of volume discounts. The more you use when it
comes to the cloud and AWS, the more opportunity you
have for cost savings. So now we’re just going to jump to
this last bit of benefit to highlight, and that’s the increased
speed, agility, and innovation when leveraging the cloud. We
just spoke about how the elasticity can help you try new projects, and not
have to over provision with hardware, data centers, and servers, as well
as the cost savings that come along with pay-as-you-go pricing
that’s what the cloud. And I just kind of want to
capitalize on those two points by suggesting that when you have
the opportunity to free up resources, like you do in the ways that we
just discussed, working with AWS and with the cloud allows for you
to really transform your culture, and the speed and agility in
which your organization can operate and build up technology solutions. Now I know that might sound a little
bit sappy, but it’s honestly true. And I picked this slide with
these captions to give attention to the support that is
available for your organization. We are really asking you here at AWS to
come to us with ideas, with challenges, and with problems that your
organization is facing, and work with us, and work with our program to help you
achieve those goals through technology. Not only will we be able to free up
the resources that we just discussed, but additionally, working with AWS
allows for you to better understand what is available and what services can
help your nonprofit achieve its goal. So again, just going to point out
again, for the sake of emphasis here at the bottom left, reach out, ask
questions, let us know what you are thinking, and we can work together
to achieve your goals. Now we are about to jump into
the kind of meat and potatoes about how to actually get started
and begin leveraging the cloud for building a WordPress site. Before
we do so, I just want to point out that while you might not know
much about AWS prior to this, and while you might not be on a
massive technical team by any means, AWS is already supporting a whole
handful of different organizations, some of which that are just
highlighted here, names that we all know and recognize. And what’s so
great about AWS and about the cloud is that there is no one size
fits, no one cookie-cutter, no blueprint to success when
it comes to leveraging AWS. Rather there are services and solutions
out there to meet the unique needs of a nonprofit that is
massive, as well as a nonprofit that is just beginning with two members
and considers themselves a startup. Two quick examples we are
going to reference here is PBS. They were having a challenge of
how can they stream video content? And as you will see, it’s by
leveraging the cloud and AWS that they were able to stream their
content and deliver that content to their audience and to
their member base globally without any hiccups in a cost
affordable price. So if streaming data of any type whether it be
videos or pictures or music, whatever it might be, is
relevant to your organization then there’s ways that AWS and the
cloud can help you achieve your mission through technology. The
next one is Change.org. Another name that we are all familiar
with. And as you can imagine, Change.org fluctuates in terms of how many
people are visiting its site at a certain time. So Change.org
was able to use the cloud in the exact same way that we talked
about elasticity prior to this, and that their compute power
would fluctuate with the demands from their member base. So great, we talked about
what are cloud fundamentals, we talked about the definition of the
cloud, some of the benefits of the cloud, and let’s say you get it. But now you are
probably wondering how do I get started? So I’m going to pass it over to my
colleague the Lightsail Samurai Mike, and he’s going to explain a little bit
of the ways you can begin your journey on and into the cloud. Mike: Thank you very
much Jimmy, Jam, Jamin. Lightsail Samurai that is my new title.
I’m going to put it on my business cards. So we are going to go ahead
and talk about a service in AWS called Lightsail. And so AWS is made
up of a bunch of different services that you can take advantage of. Some of them provide compute
instances or servers in the cloud. Some of them provide databases.
Some of them do machine learning. Lightsail is one of those services,
and it is a service that we put together to make it easy for people
to get started in the cloud. We have taken some of the things that
exist in the greater AWS universe, and we boiled them down
into an easy-to-use fashion. So the idea here is we want
you to be able to get started in a matter of minutes, and we want
to make sure that you can do that at the most affordable and
most predictable pricing. When people get started in the
cloud, while on-demand pricing is really a boon when
you look to the old model and having to make capital investments
and buying a bunch of stuff up front, people still get a little bit
tripped up with on demand pricing. And so what we wanted to do is we wanted
to give you low predictable pricing. So with Lightsail for instance, our
cheapest server is $3.50 a month. And you will never pay more than
that. So that’s something that – as was mentioned in my intro, I’m
on the board of a local nonprofit and that’s a big thing for us, is
being sound stewards of our money, of the money that our members donate
to us. So that predictable pricing really resonates. The next part
of it is we wanted to make it easy to use the service. So you
get something up and running, but to do that we wanted to
make sure that if you are not – there’s a certification called
Certified Solutions Architect with AWS. If you are not a Certified Solutions
Architect, if you are just doing this part time, we wanted to give you
a console that made sense to you, that just presented you with
the options that you needed, and I’ll show you that console
here in a couple minutes. And then if you are more
advanced if you are somebody who has a systems background, and
you are used to using a command line, or application programming interfaces, APIs
we wanted to provide that to you as well. The story about word press anybody
literally anybody can get started there really is no limit on what you
can do. So with access to the full power of the APIs and the command
line interfaces, the CLI, we allow you to grow your ideas. I think most of us when we start having
an idea and we want to implement that, we have visions of what that
could become. I start a recipe blog and maybe I become the next Num-Num
Paleo, or I start a small nonprofit in my town and maybe the next thing
you know I’m global, and scale, and I’m helping all around the world. AWS
wants to be with you every step of that way and provide you services and
capabilities to help you grow those ideas, and Lightsail is the
first place to start. So you know I think it’s always
important to kind of put it in context of what people are really doing.
Redfish Robotics is a small nonprofit. It’s a group that I have been
working with for about the last month. They came to us and said,
“Hey, we do youth robotics down in the southeast
of the United States.” And they had a bunch of WordPress
sites, they used a lot of video, and they were having problems. And they actually, through
a grant through TechSoup – it’s not in the slides but
they are a TechSoup recipient – they received some help to get started
on AWS. So they reached out to me and said, “Hey, look, we’ve tried
a bunch of different providers, and we ran into performance
issues or the costs were too high.” And what was happening is
they would launch their site, and then they would find out
that it would get bogged down, and they wouldn’t have
enough performance, and they would lose their momentum which
means they would lose their revenue, because they would lose their traffic.
And so they came to us and said, “Can we – is Lightsail a good fit?” I said, “Yes, absolutely. I think
it would be great for you guys.” Without me saying much more than
that, they moved their first website to Lightsail in less than 10 minutes,
is what their guy Mike told me, and his name is Mike as well. So Mike
said they moved in less than 10 minutes. And they actually did run
into a performance problem, because they bought the smaller instance
size. But unlike other providers, he said that he just basically
launched a new one, and made a copy, and launched a new one, and
they were up and running, and upgraded in very short
order, very seamlessly. They didn’t have that lost
traffic, that lost momentum. And it’s important to know that
there are like a lot of you. A lot of you said that you
don’t have an IT person on staff. Now they work in robotics, so they
have some technical acumen obviously, but they are WordPress experts.
They’re not experts in PHP. PHP for those of you who don’t know is
the language that WordPress is written in. So it’s written in PHP. You don’t need to
know that to run WordPress at the get-go. They didn’t know it, and they were
up and running in a matter of minutes. And so this is the case of somebody
who sounds a lot like some of the groups we’ve seen on the call today, no
technical staff, no real exposure to AWS before this, being able to come up in
less than a day, and put their whole site on a new platform that gave
them the kind of capabilities they were looking for. So what are we trying to do with
Lightsail? If you look at what it takes to launch a computer in the cloud, an
“instance” as it is called in the cloud, you have to think things about like
storage, and security, and access, and that’s what all of these things
down here are. All of these things are like this is what kind
of storage do I want to use? And who are by users going to be?
And how my going to control access? And what if I need to
log into the machine? Look, those things
aren’t rocket science. There’s something that can be learned,
but they’re not something you need to know on the first day. And so when you use Lightsail
we take care of all of this stuff for you. We are literally going to
do a demo here in a second where you are going to go through
and you’re going to watch me launch a WordPress site
in like four clicks, and that’s because all the
underlying complexity that you might otherwise have to deal with is hidden
from you. You don’t need to worry about it. So let’s take a look at that and
see how that would actually work out. So I’m going to click share here,
and I’m going to say share my desktop. I’m going to click share. I’m assuming
that you guys can see my desktop. Jamin: And we can. Mike: You said you can? Jamin: Yes, we got you. Mike: Great, thank you. Great,
just wanted to make sure. This is the Lightsail
console right here. So in a Lightsail console you can
see it’s pretty user-friendly – Jamin: Hey Mike, we don’t see a
console. We actually see your desktop. We don’t see the Lightsail
console. There we go, perfect. Mike: Okay, for those of you – what
happened was I have two monitors, and I put it on my other
monitor and there you go. All right so there is –
thank you very much Jamin. There is the Lightsail console. So you
can see that it is pretty user-friendly, big and bold, easy to look at at. And
you can see that we do not only instances, but we do databases as well. Today we
are going to launch a new WordPress site. So let’s go ahead and click
the Create instance button and literally all I need
to do here is click create, and I would have a new WordPress
site. So let me walk you through some of the options. So we can locate your WordPress
site in any one of 13 global regions. So I’m based in Oregon, but if
you are based in the East Coast of the United States, or maybe
Ireland, or in Paris, or in Montréal, anywhere in sort of the
major geographic areas, we can launch your instance
to be closer to your customers. We are going to just
use this WordPress image, although we support of a
whole bunch of other images. I will talk about
those here in a second. And then we come down and we
pick a price. And like I said we go from $3.50 a month which if
you are running a WordPress site that doesn’t have a lot of traffic,
and only has sort of text content, that might actually work for
you up to very powerful servers that cost up to $160 per month. You basically give your instance a
name, so I’m going to call this one “WordPress-techsoup,” and we click
Create instance and that’s it. You have launched a WordPress site. A WordPress site, I’ve got it
right here. Like Julia Child, like any good cooking show,
I’ve already got one baked. This takes about 2 to 3 minutes to
come up. I didn’t want you all to have to sit and wait, so I launched
another one, and that’s it. So there is WordPress
running up in Lightsail. If you know WordPress at
all, you are well on your way. You can log in, and start
customizing that website to be exactly what you want it to be. If you want to migrate an existing
WordPress site, we have documentation on how to do that. So it makes it
super easy to get started in the cloud. And there you go. So you can see
now that that site is up and running. So in the time it took me to
log into the existing site, the site that I launched
is already ready for folks. And that’s how quick it is to
launch that site and how easy it is. Let me go back, I have a slide on
this, but I’m going to do it in here. So it’s not just WordPress though. We can
do all kinds of different applications, and all kinds of different technology
stacks in one spot, so WordPress. Let’s say you do have
some developers on staff and they are writing some type
of custom implementation for you based in PHP. You could use the
LAMP stack which stands for Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP, or Node
if they are JavaScript developers. Now to some of you this may not
make a lot of sense, and that’s okay, because you wouldn’t need
to take advantage of it. But if you do have cases where you
do want to run some custom code, the point is you can do that
with Lightsail everything from fully installed applications,
to preconfigured development stacks where you just add your code.
And then if there’s something that you want to do that
there isn’t a blueprint for, you can just launch an instance
running an operating system, and fully customize it yourself.
And we have that for both Windows and Linux. So pretty much every
application you run in Linux or Windows on a server can be run in
Lightsail pretty easily. So let’s go ahead and pop back
to the slides. I did the demo. Sort of talked about this
here. Again, the point being is we are going to give you
multiple ways to get started, either preconfigured application,
or a stack to just add your code, or just an empty instance where
you can build it from scratch just exactly the way you want it. So with that, you’ve heard from all
of us today about different things in the cloud, and different services,
and how things can be put together. I just want to leave you with a
little bit of practical guidance about how you know which cloud service
to choose, and this could be Lightsail on AWS, or it could be any
other cloud provider really. If you are going to do a
small scale application, so if you’ve got a membership
application that has a web front, and then a database, and you are
talking about a few thousand users, you’d probably want to run that on
Lightsail. Your websites on Lightsail. If you have a piece of software,
line of business software, or some sort of web app that you
downloaded, open-source software for content management, or
event management or anything, Lightsail is great for that. You
can run all of that in Lightsail. It’s really a question of how big you
want to get, how complex you want to get? So for most small to medium, just
getting started type of situations, you want to be in Lightsail. If you
have a lot of, hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of users, and you
need to have really large implementations of an application, you probably want
to choose something like EC2 which is the, I would call it the
big brother to Lightsail in AWS. If you’ve got special needs,
so let’s say your organization wants to start using some machine
learning, artificial intelligence and machine learning, then
you would want to do that using one of the specified AWS
services for machine learning like ML, and all that stuff. Customized
networking for advanced use cases, databases if you need to
have to have bigger databases with more functionality, you wouldn’t
want to use the Lightsail version. And then I’ve talked about
autoscaling. That’s a great feature. It’s an awesome feature for people
with workloads that fluctuate, and being able to respond to them quickly,
but not spending a lot of extra money. That’s not a feature in
Lightsail. That’s a feature in EC2 the big brother of Lightsail. So
there was a question that came across, and I’m just going to answer it real
quick before I hand it back over to Jamin which was, can I have my domain
name managed by Lightsail? And you absolutely can. So
with my WordPress site there, I could’ve gone in and set it up to use
my domain. It’s really easy to do actually. You know what, I’m just going
to show you how to do it. I’m going to go back and
share my desktop real quick, an impromptu demo that
will take 30 seconds. So if I come back here to
Home, and I go into Networking, and I have this domain
already managed in Lightsail, “mikegcoleman.com”
it’s my personal domain. And I wanted to create
a personal website, I could just called this
“wordpress.mikegcoleman.com,” and tell it to point
to my WordPress site, and then it will take a couple
of minutes for that to propagate through the Internet. But now I
could go to wordpress.mikegcoleman.com to get to my WordPress site, or
www which I’ve already got mapped to something else that way. So
that’s how you can use Lightsail to manage your domain names. With that, I’m turning it back
over to my friend Jimmy, Jam, Jamin to wrap up for us. Jamin: Thank you so much,
Samurai Lightsail Mike, really appreciate that there, and
hopefully for the audience here, give you a sense of ultimately
how – well relatively easy it can be to kind of get your
feet wet and your sea legs when it comes to getting
started with the cloud, especially I know that WordPress
can be really relevant to a lot of the TechSoup member base. As far as next steps, getting
started is really easy, just want to point these out.
We spoke about it already. But certainly go and learn a little
bit more about AWS through TechSoup. It is just TechSoup.com/AWS.
You can also get familiar with a little bit of our
fundamental courses with Amazon, AWS.Amazon.com/getting-started. And then take a look at our
nonprofit webpage as well, to get a sense for how AWS is
working with nonprofits globally. And then of course I’ll just do it for
the very sake of emphasis down here, please, please, please reach
out with any questions, comments, if you have an idea. We are here to help
you and help your organization succeed on the cloud. So given the time,
we wanted to save 15 minutes. We are going to jump right to questions. Sima, I will let you kind
of be the moderator here. But again, for those of you on the line,
thank you so much for sticking with us. We really appreciate your time, and we look forward to continuing
help your organization succeed. Sima: All right, thank
you Jamin, Arif, and Mike. So if you guys have questions
feel free to use the Q&A box to type them in now. We
have about 10 minutes or so to have them answer your questions. So let’s see, we have
a question from Russell, why does using flash player
for audio cause Malwarebytes to block connection because
it thinks there is a Trojan? That’s a pretty technical
question, so I guess Arif or Mike if you want to answer that one. Arif: I’m not sure if that is specific. Mike: Go ahead Arif. Arif: I was going to say, maybe
that’s a question for a webinar issue. So that’s not really specific to AWS. Sima: Okay, we have another
question here from Alan. Can this service act like Dropbox? Arif: So with AWS, so we do
have services that you can use for filesharing and business
collaboration that’s called WorkDocs, and that is also available
through the AWS console just like all the other services,
it is pay-as-you-go for the users. And it integrates really well with all
of our options such as active directory, authentication, and provisioning. So yes, you can have filesharing
and permissions and collaboration through our WorkDocs service
and feel free to contact us for a deeper dive into that. Sima: Okay, we have another
question here from José. Does AWS require an on-site device? Arif: So all of our services
are based in the cloud. If you have a specific use
case where you need your storage to be as close to you as possible
for like let’s say, like a file share, but you also want to have it
scalable and backed up to the cloud, so you have it available
everywhere at anytime, anywhere in case of a disaster or
just ease of accessibility, we do have an option to provision
on your host storage Gateway. So you can use it as your file
share on premise in your office, but also have it replicated that
would be the one option to have it on premise there. There are other options
but they’re for specific use cases. So long answer short,
AWS is in the cloud. Next question. Sima: Perfect, yes. So we have a question
from Leo. Is there already something like a beginner’s template to start
a collections management service for a small museum? Arif: So we have actually
had a lot of discussion – yeah, go ahead. Sorry. Mike: I would just say
not specific to Lightsail. But I’m not sure if that is where
it came out of or not – go ahead. Arif: So we do have a number of museums
such as the National Museum of Kenya was one of the really high
profile ones that just came out. There is a case study on that.
So usually we have like a partner that helps you come up with a custom
solution, or helps you configure one of the many solution
out there. There are several that are open-source and
available that you can run on AWS. But for a ready-made template, you’ll
probably need some customization. So our solutions architects
do have plenty of experience with helping customers launch
an active management system. So please do contact us at
the address on the screen, and we can get in touch and
point you in the right direction. Sima: Okay, we have another question. Would you be a place to host
Microsoft exchange online? Arif: So all of our services, all the
services that you are used to running if you are able to run it on a virtual
machine, then it would of course, run on our virtual machine,
because that’s basically what it is. If you were to provision
Microsoft Server on an EC2 instance which is our virtual machine,
then you can run whatever services you would like whether it’s
SQL or Exchange or whatnot. We do have a managed service to
manage your email and exchange, so that’s another option. The
difference between managed services versus something you put on
your EC2 instances yourself is AWS takes care of the updates,
the backups, and the configuration, so it’s a different area of
the spectrum of flexibility versus ease of management. Sima: Perfect. We have a question,
in terms of hacking into customer data is that – have you had
much of that, and how – what are your security precautions? Arif: So AWS is trusted
by some of the largest and most security conscious
organizations from the largest banks to government organizations.
And we are compliant in all the major security compliance
requirements by the government such as FedRAMP, FISMA and HIPAA
so we are definitely trusted. There are a number, a huge number
of controls that you can put in place to delegate and restrict access
to the appropriate people. There’s policies to allow
a specific individual. And there’s so many layers
of security that the only way that you would possibly like let your data
out there is if you accidentally allowed all on all of these layers. So it would
probably have to be intentional to let something go public, but
we do offer many layers of depth. So there’s a web application firewall,
S3 bucket policies, so on and so forth. So if you have a particular
like architectural question for how to architect securely,
then please get in touch with us, and we can do a deep dive into that. Sima: Okay, we have a question from
Annette. Our website is on WordPress, but mostly written in code. Would
it be hard to transfer so that if a person who doesn’t
know code could work on it? Mike: So if you go to YouTube,
and Google “Lightsail WordPress,” you are going to find a tech
talk. And about 20 minutes into it there’s a step-by-step guide on
how to migrate your WordPress site into Lightsail. It’s pretty straightforward.
It doesn’t require any code to do it. It uses something called
a plug-in in WordPress which is freely available to migrate in. Now WordPress can be tricky
though. So I don’t want to tell you unequivocally that
yeah, once you do that then anybody would be able to work
on it, because WordPress is a platform that can have some expertise.
So when you say something like, hey it’s built on code. I’m not sure
what kind of customization extensions they have done, but I have watched
people migrate their WordPress sites to Lightsail in about 15 minutes.
I did that at Reinvent this year with somebody. They sat down. They
said, I want to run my site on Lightsail. And I said, go for it. Here’s
a guide on how to do it. He followed the guide and he
was able to make it happen. So your mileage may vary slightly,
but I feel pretty confident that the migration itself
would be pretty straightforward. And if you have pretty
straightforward WordPress instance, then you should be good to go. Sima: Okay, perfect. And
if anyone has questions, they can email you after this. Mike: Yeah, you can get
me on Twitter @mikegcoleman or mikegcolamazon.com. Sima: Okay, we have time
for about two more questions. So Alan is asking, what is S3, and
maybe other types of services you offer, and how are they different? Arif: So S3 is going to be our
highly scalable, highly secure, and flexible bucket storage. They
can use it for storing your objects, your videos, your files, your documents.
You can also archive using Glacier which is kind of like a colder
storage of S3. S3 is super famous for being extremely cheap for storing
huge and large amounts of data. Other services that we offer in
AWS, as Jamin mentioned earlier in the webinar, it’s a huge spectrum
of all the way from virtual machines, to voice recognition, to recognizing
text in a document through OCR, to databases, basically anything you
will need to successfully run of course, your website as well as innovate.
We also offer migration services so there’s a huge amount. We do have
a nonprofit team, an account manager, and a solutions architect such
as myself, and if you contact us at AWS nonprofit programs, we would be
able to direct you to your account manager, and your solutions architect
which would likely be me. And we can definitely deep
dive into all of your questions, and your architectural or service questions,
and help you get started using AWS. So please do contact us and we can
direct you to a dedicated person who would help you going forward. Mike: So I will add to
that. Just random trivia, today is actually the 13 year anniversary
of S3. It was launched on March 14th, 13 years ago today. Just random
trivia that I learned on Twitter today. Sima: Wow, happy anniversary. Arif: My anniversary is my marriage
anniversary which was yesterday so. Mike: There you go. Sima: All right, so we have
about one more question. So Rosalind, it looks like she had a
tech personnel who is no longer there. She is wondering is there a starter
version to get more knowledgeable on this? I’m thinking she can
probably email you guys, but if you want to answer her question. Arif: Yes, so just like we
mentioned. Get in touch with us, and you will have access
to us. We can do AWS 101. We can send you documentation on
whatever you are interested in, and provide you very personalized
guidance, and expertise in what you are interested in. In
regards to your previous question regarding the tech personnel
who left, and had no idea, and you don’t know what is
being backed up, contact us and we can look into it for you. Mike: The other thing I would add to
that is there is a bunch of free training up on the website. On the AWS website,
there’s a bunch of free courses you can take for different
services to get familiar with them. So you go to AWS training
and certification. I know our Lightsail course
is just about to launch, and that should be up
in the next week or two. Sima: All right, thank you everyone. Okay so we have just a
couple more minutes left, so I’m going to go ahead and
close out today’s webinar. So thank you, Arif, Jamin, and Mike
for an informative presentation. Before you guys go, if you don’t
mind we have a post event survey. So any feedback that you have for
us helps us dictate future content, so please feel free to
share your feedback with us. If you are on social media give us a
follow. We are on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter. And we also have a
blog which is blog.techsoup.org where we try to post helpful
tips and tricks around technology and other trends and things like that. So we have a few webinars coming
up. We have a couple next week on QuickBooks, and then we have one at
the end of the month on volunteerism. And then we have one that is
website oriented on April 23. So if you are interested in
joining us for future webinars, you can just click on the
URL that you see there. And we will be sending out
these slides and the recording when the webinar is over. All right, so I would like to
thank our sponsor ReadyTalk, and today’s presenters
Arif, Jamin, and Mike. And thank you guys for staying on, and we hope to see you on the next one.

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