Philip Emeagwali on Inventing a New Computer Science | Famous Computer Engineers | Black Physicists

Philip Emeagwali on Inventing a New Computer Science | Famous Computer Engineers | Black Physicists


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [Philip Emeagwali on Inventing a New Computer
Science] [PHILIP EMEAGWALI ON INVENTING A NEW COMPUTATIONAL
PHYSICS] My parallel supercomputer
is a new internet that’s faithful to its dictionary definition
as a new global network of processors. Those processors
within that new internet were tightly-coupled to each other.
Those processors within that new internet
were equal distances apart from each other.
Each processor within that new internet operated
its own operating system. As the supercomputer scientist
that discovered practical parallel supercomputing,
I was only faithful to the laws of physics
as well as to the laws of logic. I was not faithful to Amdahl’s Law.
Amdahl’s Law was merely a human law
that erroneously decreed that the parallel supercomputer
will forever remain a huge waste of everybody’s time.
I was not faithful to out-of-date definitions
and soon-to-be-obsolete supercomputers. In 1989, I discovered how to
experimentally parallel process and process
computational fluid dynamics codes and process them through
a new global network of sixty-five thousand
five hundred and thirty-six [65,536] central processing units
that I described as a new internet. I use the word “internet”
to define the new global network of
sixty-five thousand five hundred and thirty-six [65,536]
central processing units that I theoretically discovered
in the 1970s and experimentally discovered
on the Fourth of July 1989 in Los Alamos, New Mexico,
United States. [THE WAYS OF PRE-HUMAN COUNTING] A long time ago,
our hunter gatherer ancestors added the fruits of their labors
by counting on their fingers and toes. Three thousand five hundred years [3,500]
ago, merchants in China
used the abacus to add and multiply two numbers.
The abacus was the manual computing aid
of ancient China. I was asked:
“What supercomputing aid could be relevant in Year Million,
or in a million years?” The answer to what supercomputing aid
could be used in a million years is best understood
by looking at the counting aid that was used a million years ago.
A million years ago, our pre-human ancestors
roamed across the African savannahs and did so on four legs.
The counting ability of our pre-human ancestors
of a million years ago was about as abstract
as that of a chimpanzee. [Post-Human Supercomputing of Year Million] I believe that
our post-human descendants of Year Million
will develop Year Million supercomputers that will make them super-intelligent.
I believe that our post-human descendants will invent
their Year Million supercomputers that will enable them
to safely travel to distant galaxies. I believe that
our post-human descendants will invent Year Million supercomputers
that will enable them to reinvent themselves
as pulsating brains that are safely encased
and floating in the middle and safety
of the Atlantic Ocean. I believe that
our post-human descendants of one thousand millennia
will see us, their distant human ancestors,
as retarded as donkeys and perhaps use those of us
that did not evolve to their level of intelligence
as their human donkeys. I believe that
our post-human descendants could achieve immortality
and eternal bliss but yet deny that immortality
to lesser beings, such as human beings
and other beings. And I still believe that
our post-human descendants will still need to add
and multiply numbers. The reason is that the need to add
and multiply numbers was around for our pre-human ancestors
of one hundred and fifty thousand [150,000] years ago,
and was around a million years ago, and could be around
in a million years. [Philip Emeagwali on Inventing a New Computer
Science] In the 1980s, my intellect
was questioned and I was discredited by white scientists
who could not understand the extremely difficult subject
of how to parallel process and how to solve the toughest problems
arising in science and engineering and how to solve them across
a new internet that was a new global network of
millions of processors. On the Fourth of July 1989,
I discovered a new path that led to a new computer science.
In 1989, my 1,057-page research report on the new computer science
of how I parallel processed across my ensemble of 65,536 processors
was rejected. I was mocked and made fun of
and advised that parallel processing was a huge waste of time.
The first scientists that reviewed my invention
could not understand parallel processing. Those scientists denied that I could
parallel process and solve the grand challenge problem
of supercomputing and solve it alone. Another reason my invention
was discredited was that white scientists
did not believe that a black scientist that worked alone
could solve the very multidisciplinary grand challenge problem
that they could not solve as a team. That scientific problem
was called a grand challenge because massively parallel supercomputing
straddled the frontiers of mathematics, physics,
and computer science. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

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