Philip Emeagwali Computer | Famous Black Inventors and their Inventions | Black History Month

Philip Emeagwali Computer | Famous Black Inventors and their Inventions | Black History Month


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [How I Opened the Door to the Supercomputer] My 1989 experimental discovery
of how and why parallel processing makes modern computers faster
and makes the new supercomputer the fastest
namely, the Philip Emeagwali formula that then United States President
Bill Clinton described in his White House speech of
August 26, 2000 occurred at the frontier of knowledge
about the massively parallel processing supercomputer.
That invention of the massively parallel processing supercomputer
that occurred on the Fourth of July 1989 in Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States
led me to discover that inventing a new technology
creates a need for a new vocabulary and a new narrative
for the histories of science and technology. After my invention
of the high-performance supercomputer, I became like the ancient mariner
who travelled around the world to tell his story to different people.
Since 1989, school children are asked to do a school report
on the contributions of Philip Emeagwali to the development of the supercomputer.
Back in 1989, it made the news headlines that a lone wolf
African supercomputer wizard that worked alone for sixteen years
across supercomputer laboratories in the United States
has invented the massively parallel processing
supercomputer and has invented
how to parallel compute, or solve a million problems (or processes)
at once, instead of solving only one problem
at a time. Those newspaper articles wrote that
his invention of the high-performance supercomputer
will have rich, fertile, and far-reaching consequences.
That African supercomputer wizard invented
how to always perform the fastest supercomputer calculations
and how to perform them by solving a million problems (or processes)
at once, instead of solving only one problem
at a time. I—Philip Emeagwali—
was that African supercomputer scientist that was in the news
back in 1989. I was in the news
because I experimentally discovered that the fastest speeds
in supercomputing can always be recorded
with massively parallel processing technology. That technology
enabled me to massively compute 65,536 things at once,
or in parallel at as many processors. My experimental discovery
that parallel processing is the engine that drives the
computer to compute faster and drives the supercomputer
to compute fastest made the news headlines
onwards of 1989. My invention
was widely recorded, from supercomputer publications
to the June 20, 1990 issue of the Wall Street Journal
and that invention remains the most talked about invention
in the history of computing. My invention
made the news headlines because I experimentally discovered
the fastest computation and I invented the technique
across the slowest 65,536 tightly-coupled processors
that are commonly available in the market.
My invention of the high-performance supercomputer
made the news headlines because I invented parallel processing
and I invented the technology when everybody rejected
parallel processing. I invented parallel processing
and I invented the technology as a lone wolf supercomputer programmer.
I experimentally discovered the fastest computation
and I invented the technique for discovering it by harnessing
the total computing power of a parallel processing machine
powered by an ensemble of the slowest 65,536
tightly-coupled processors in the world.
I experimentally discovered the fastest computation
that could be recorded with parallel processing technology.
I experimentally discovered the fastest supercomputer
and I invented the technology when the supercomputer textbooks
and the leaders of thought in supercomputing
predicted that parallel processing will not work within
the high-performance supercomputer. I invented
the massively parallel processing supercomputer
and I invented the technology when computational physicists
warned that it will forever be impossible
to compute many things (or process many processes)
at once. When I invented
the high-performance supercomputer, the 25,000 vector processing supercomputer
scientists in the world that were led by Seymour Cray
believed that parallel processing will forever remain
a huge waste of everybody’s time. I invented how to harness
the high-performance supercomputer that computes with a million,
or more, processors that were already available in the market
and how to harness those processors to massively parallel process
and how to harness the fastest, parallel processing supercomputer
to solve the toughest problems arising in computational physics,
such as when solving the initial-boundary value problems
arising in calculus, science, and engineering.
I invented how to harness parallel processing
and harness the technology to solve the most extreme-scale problems
arising in modern algebra. I invented
how to harness the high-performance supercomputer and harness it to solve
the toughest problems arising in extreme-scale
computational physics. That invention
was critical to solving the most vexing grand challenge problems
arising in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
I invented how to harness parallel processing
and harness the technology to solve the computation-intensive
problem that is described as petroleum reservoir simulation
and that was classified by the United States government
as one of the twenty most vexing grand challenges
in supercomputing. My invention
of how to solve a million problems (or process a million processes) at once
and how to compute simultaneously while solving the most
computation-intensive problems arising in extreme-scale
computational physics made the news headlines because
I was an unknown black, sub-Saharan African supercomputer scientist
that challenged the most well-known and well-regarded
supercomputer scientists of the 1970s and ‘80s.
Those leading lights of computing and supercomputing—namely,
the likes of Steve Jobs, Seymour Cray, and Gene Amdahl—warned that
parallel processing will forever remain impossible.
I was warned that I will never discover
the massively parallel processing supercomputer. I was warned that
I will never record the fastest speeds in computation
and record those speeds across my ensemble of the slowest 65,536 tightly-coupled
processors in the world. But on the Fourth of July 1989,
I discovered that the toughest problems
arising in extreme-scaled computational physics
that were believed to be impossible to solve
on only one processor are, in fact, possible to solve, across
a massively parallel processing supercomputer powered by a new global network
of the slowest sixty-five thousand
five hundred and thirty-six [65,536] identical processors
that were already available in the market
and that is a new internet, de facto. I invented
how to solve the toughest problems
arising in supercomputing and how to solve those problems
across my new global network of processors
that I named a “primordial internet”
and that I visualized as a small copy of the internet.
I visualized that new internet as a new global network
of 64 binary thousand processors that I could harness
to both communicate synchronously and to compute simultaneously
and to solve 65,536 problems and to solve them
with a one-to-one correspondence between problems and processors.
I invented how to massively parallel process
and how to compute across my new global network of
64 binary thousand processors that is a new internet.
I invented parallel processing and I invented the technology
when it was written in all supercomputer textbooks
that it will forever remain impossible to theoretically invent
how to parallel process and to invent
how to parallel compute across eight processors.
In the 1980s, I theoretically and experimentally discovered
that my new internet is a new supercomputer
and a new computer, de facto. The African-American poet,
Mari Evans, said: “Speak the truth
to the people.” My scientific truth was controversial
in the 1970s and ‘80s. In those two decades, I was banished
from the community of 25,000 vector processing
supercomputer scientists. I was forced to parallel program abandoned
massively parallel processing supercomputers as a lone wolf. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

One thought to “Philip Emeagwali Computer | Famous Black Inventors and their Inventions | Black History Month”

  1. My invention
    was widely recorded, from supercomputer publications to the June 20, 1990 issue of the Wall Street Journal and that invention remains the most talked about invention in the history of computing. My invention made the news headlines because I experimentally discovered the fastest computation and I invented the technique across the slowest 65,536 tightly-coupled processors that are commonly available in the market. My invention of the high-performance supercomputer made the news headlines because I invented parallel processing and I invented the technology when everybody rejected parallel processing. I invented parallel processing and I invented the technology

    as a lone wolf supercomputer programmer.

    I experimentally discovered

    the fastest computation

    and I invented the technique

    for discovering it by harnessing

    the total computing power

    of a parallel processing machine

    powered by an ensemble

    of the slowest 65,536

    tightly-coupled processors

    in the world.

    I experimentally discovered

    the fastest computation

    that could be recorded

    with parallel processing technology.

    I experimentally discovered

    the fastest supercomputer

    and I invented the technology

    when the supercomputer textbooks

    and the leaders of thought

    in supercomputing

    predicted that parallel processing

    will not work within

    the high-performance supercomputer.

    I invented

    the massively parallel processing

    supercomputer

    and I invented the technology

    when computational physicists

    warned that

    it will forever be impossible

    to compute many things

    (or process many processes)

    at once.

    When I invented

    the high-performance supercomputer,

    the 25,000 vector processing supercomputer scientists in the world that were led by Seymour Cray

    believed that

    parallel processing will forever remain

    a huge waste of everybody’s time.

    I invented how to harness

    the high-performance supercomputer

    that computes with a million,

    or more, processors that were already available in the market

    and how to harness those processors

    to massively parallel process

    and how to harness the

    fastest, parallel processing supercomputer

    to solve the toughest problems

    arising in computational physics,

    such as when solving

    the initial-boundary value problems

    arising in calculus, science,

    and engineering.

    I invented

    how to harness parallel processing

    and harness the technology

    to solve the most extreme-scale problems

    arising in modern algebra.

    I invented

    how to harness the high-performance supercomputer

    and harness it to solve

    the toughest problems

    arising in extreme-scale

    computational physics.

    That invention

    was critical to solving the most vexing

    grand challenge problems

    arising in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

    I invented

    how to harness parallel processing

    and harness the technology

    to solve the computation-intensive

    problem that is described

    as petroleum reservoir simulation

    and that was classified

    by the United States government

    as one of the twenty

    most vexing grand challenges

    in supercomputing.

    My invention

    of how to solve a million problems

    (or process a million processes) at once

    and how to compute simultaneously

    while solving the most

    computation-intensive problems

    arising in extreme-scale

    computational physics

    made the news headlines because

    I was an unknown black, sub-Saharan African supercomputer scientist

    that challenged the most well-known

    and well-regarded

    supercomputer scientists

    of the 1970s and ‘80s.

    Those leading lights of computing

    and supercomputing—namely,

    the likes of Steve Jobs, Seymour Cray, and Gene Amdahl—warned that

    parallel processing will forever

    remain impossible.

    I was warned that

    I will never discover

    the massively parallel processing supercomputer.

    I was warned that

    I will never record the fastest speeds

    in computation

    and record those speeds across

    my ensemble of the slowest 65,536 tightly-coupled processors in the world.

    But on the Fourth of July 1989,

    I discovered

    that the toughest problems

    arising in extreme-scaled

    computational physics

    that were believed to be impossible

    to solve

    on only one processor

    are, in fact, possible to solve, across

    a massively parallel processing supercomputer

    powered by a new global network

    of the slowest

    sixty-five thousand

    five hundred and thirty-six [65,536]

    identical processors

    that were already available

    in the market

    and that is a new internet, de facto.

    I invented

    how to solve

    the toughest problems

    arising in supercomputing

    and how to solve those problems

    across

    my new global network of processors

    that I named

    a “primordial internet”

    and that I visualized

    as a small copy of the internet.

    I visualized that new internet

    as a new global network

    of 64 binary thousand processors

    that I could harness

    to both communicate synchronously

    and to compute simultaneously

    and to solve 65,536 problems

    and to solve them

    with a one-to-one correspondence

    between problems and processors.

    I invented

    how to massively parallel process

    and how to compute across

    my new global network of

    64 binary thousand processors

    that is a new internet.

    I invented parallel processing

    and I invented the technology

    when it was written

    in all supercomputer textbooks

    that it will forever remain impossible

    to theoretically invent

    how to parallel process

    and to invent

    how to parallel compute across

    eight processors.

    In the 1980s, I theoretically

    and experimentally discovered

    that my new internet

    is a new supercomputer

    and a new computer, de facto.

    The African-American poet,

    Mari Evans, said:

    “Speak the truth

    to the people.”

    My scientific truth was controversial

    in the 1970s and ‘80s.

    In those two decades, I was banished

    from the community of

    25,000 vector processing

    supercomputer scientists.

    I was forced to parallel program abandoned massively parallel processing supercomputers

    as a lone wolf.

    [Opening Doors to the Modern Supercomputer
    ]

    The June 14, 1976 issue

    of the Computer World

    —the flagship publication

    of the computer world—

    carried an article titled:

    [quote]

    “Research in Parallel Processing Questioned

    as ‘Waste of Time.’”

    [unquote]

    My experimental discovery

    that occurred

    on the Fourth of July 1989

    was that parallel processing

    is not a huge waste of everybody’s time.

    The reason my experimental discovery

    of parallel processing

    was science cover stories in 1989

    was that it opened the door

    to promising lines of research

    in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology.

    My invention

    of the massively parallel processing supercomputer

    opened the door

    to extreme-scale computations

    arising in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and medicine.

    My invention

    of how to massively parallel process

    and how to process across

    millions upon millions

    of already-available processors

    opened the door to a new world

    in which extreme-scale computations

    that were previously

    impossible to compute

    on a vector processing supercomputer

    are now possible to compute

    across a new internet

    that is a new global network of

    equidistant and identical

    processors

    that were already available

    in the market anyway.

    Briefly, the most

    computation-intensive problems

    arising in physics

    include problems arising from

    using the laws of physics

    and encoding those laws

    into systems of

    partial differential equations

    of modern calculus

    that are then reduced

    to systems of equations

    of algebra

    and that are then further reduced

    to an equivalent set of

    floating-point operations

    of arithmetic.

    Contributions of Philip Emeagwali to the Computer

    I’m Philip Emeagwali.

    I contributed

    to the development of the

    high-performance computer

    and I contributed

    by inventing

    the technology of parallel processing

    that is embodied in most computers

    and embodied in all supercomputers.

    Philip Emeagwali

    is the subject of school reports because

    my contributions

    changed the way we think of

    the supercomputer.

    In the old way

    and before my invention,

    we thought of the supercomputer

    as solving only one problem

    at a time.

    In the new way

    and after my invention,

    we think of the supercomputer

    as solving

    millions upon millions of problems

    at once.

    On the Fourth of July 1989,

    I experimentally discovered

    that the high-performance supercomputer

    must be powered by

    the largest ensemble of

    processors

    that were already available

    in the market anyway.

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