Parallel Computing | The Importance of My Invention | Philip Emeagwali | Nigerian Computer Engineer

Parallel Computing | The Importance of My Invention | Philip Emeagwali | Nigerian Computer Engineer


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [The Importance of Supercomputing] [I Was Dismissed From Supercomputing Research
Teams] In the 1970s and ‘80s,
the supercomputer-hopeful technology, called parallel processing,
was mocked, ridiculed, and dismissed as a huge waste of everybody’s time.
Today, parallel processing is universally used
to reduce the time-to-solution of the toughest problems
arising in the field of supercomputing. Parallel processing is used
to increase the speed of the fastest computers
and all supercomputers. My discovery
of practical parallel processing was how I entered as a benchmark
into the history of the development of the computer and the internet. [Inventor Reports on Philip Emeagwali] In U.S. public libraries,
I see 12-year-olds writing school reports on the contributions
of Philip Emeagwali to the development of the computer.
I entered into school curricula after my discovery
of practical parallel supercomputing. That discovery occurred
on the Fourth of July 1989 in Los Alamos, New Mexico,
United States. My discovery
of practical parallel supercomputing made the news headlines because
it was new knowledge that changed the way
we look at the supercomputer. My discovery
of practical parallel supercomputing was recorded
in the June 20, 1990 issue of the Wall Street Journal.
At its core essence, parallel supercomputing
is about one billion processors computing together
to solve one big problem. Parallel supercomputing
is the vanguard of computer science. The parallel supercomputer
is the engine that is used to discover new knowledge
and solve grand challenge problems arising in STEM fields. [Contributions to the Supercomputer] My contribution
to the development of the computer is this:
I discovered that we can parallel process
and solve grand challenge problems arising in mathematics and physics
and solve them across a new internet that is a new global network
of commodity-off-the-shelf processors that shared nothing between them.
I paradigm shifted from computing only one thing at a time,
or in sequence, to supercomputing one million things
at once, or in parallel. I was the first person
to solve a grand challenge problem and solve it by dividing it
into smaller problems and communicating them via emails
to sixty-five thousand five hundred and thirty-six [65,536]
processors. I was the first person
to solve as many as sixty-five thousand five hundred and thirty-six [65,536]
parallel processed initial-boundary value problems
of mathematical physics and solved them at once.
My discovery, called practical parallel processing,
is the vital technology that must be used to solve
the toughest problems arising science and engineering
and used to solve them in minimum time. [Supercomputing From Fiction to Fact] When I began sequential supercomputing,
on June 20, 1974 at age 19, parallel supercomputing
then only existed in the realm of science fiction.
For the sixty-seven years, onward of February 1, 1922,
parallel supercomputing only existed as an urban legend
of the mathematical physics community. My parallel supercomputing experiment
made the news headlines, back in 1989.
But my discovery of the fastest computer speed
was not newsworthy for pushing the boundaries
of how fast supercomputers could compute.
My discovery was newsworthy because I discovered the fastest speeds across
a new internet that I described as a new global network of
65,536 processors that tightly-encircled a globe.
That discovery enabled the supercomputer
to be true to its vital technology that is named
“parallel processing.” Parallel processing revolutionized
the field of supercomputing by giving it new horizons
that ranges from the mathematician’s blackboard
to the engineer’s drawing board. The serial processed weather forecast
is unpredictable. We parallel process
the grand challenge problem of weather forecasting
to make unpredictable weather predictable. [Importance of Parallel Computing in Your
Everyday Life] The speed of a computer
can be increased by packing more transistors on chips
and/or putting more central processing units
and graphics processing units and using them
as identical cores and nodes of a global network of processing units
that are equal distances apart and that are on the surface of a globe.
Why is the supercomputer of today much faster than
the supercomputer of 1988, and earlier? The modern supercomputer is faster because
its underlying parallel processing units
did the supercomputing. The processor
is the brain of the computer. In the modern computer,
the serial kernel of an application code is computed within
a few central processing units that each computed
only one thing at a time. In the modern supercomputer,
the parallel kernel of an application code is parallel computed within
the graphics processing unit that computed many things at once,
or in parallel. The graphics processing unit
is a parallel processing tool that is used by
the central processing unit to perform faster computations
just like the central processing unit is a sequential processing tool
that is used by the sequential processing human computer
to perform faster computations. The graphics processing unit
is a massively parallel machine, and its presence inside your computer
redefined your computer as parallel processing.
The graphics processing unit computes in parallel,
or computes many things at once. The graphics processing unit
computes the computation-intensive kernel
of your application and did so
when that kernel could be parallelized. The few cores within
the central processing unit serially computed the portion
of the computation-intensive physics code
that could not be parallelized. If the central processing unit
is the brain of your computer then the graphics processing unit
is the soul of your computer. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

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