Odyssey of the Dragonlords D&D 5e Campaign & Setting Review – Arcanum Worlds

Odyssey of the Dragonlords D&D 5e Campaign & Setting Review – Arcanum Worlds


This video is brought to you by The Deck
of Many and their Big Bad Booklet series. Hello and welcome back to the Gallant Goblin! I’m Theo, and today we’re taking a
look at Odyssey of the Dragonlords. As we wait for the new official D&D campaign
setting book, Mythic Odysseys of Theros, which will take us to the Greece-inspired
Magic: The Gathering realm of Theros, I thought we should look at this book,
which you can pick up right now. Odyssey of the Dragonlords is one
of the most impressive and exciting 3rd party D&D books I’ve picked up. It’s a 5e campaign and setting book based
on Greek mythology from Arcanum Worlds, which is a company founded by James Ohlen and
Jesse Sky, who were creative directors at Bioware. They also brought in Drew Karpyshyn,
another well known game writer. You may not be familiar with their names—I wasn’t— but if you’re a fan of RPG computer games, I
bet you’ve played at least some of their work. Their collective portfolio includes Baldur’s Gate 1
and 2, Dragon Age: Origins, Mass Effect 1 and 2, and Star Wars: Knights of the Old
Republic, among many others. This book will allow you to run a
full campaign in this new setting using the fifth edition D&D rules
you probably already know. They successfully funded Odyssey of the
Dragonlords on Kickstarter on May 16, 2019. In this video, I’ll give you a brief
overview of the world and story, and then we’ll take a look at the
components included in the set. As always, you can check the video
description below for timestamps if you’d like to skip around to a
specific section of the video. I’m going to attempt to avoid story spoilers, but if you want to stay completely spoiler-free,
use the timestamps below to skip ahead to the conclusions for my final thoughts. This set here includes the hardcover campaign
book, which is about 475 pages long, a softcover Player’s Guide which will help
your players create new characters and learn about the world that they are about to explore, a custom GM screen, and a large set of maps. Odyssey of the Dragonlords includes a campaign to take
a party of 4 to 6 players from level 1 through level 20. It also includes a full campaign setting, the lost
continent of Thylea, as well as new monsters, spells, treasures, new subclasses for each of
the core 5e classes, six new playable races, and, perhaps most excitingly, a new way to hook your
players into the story, something they call Epic Paths. Let me tell you a little bit about Thylea and the state
of the world when the players start the campaign. All of this information is from the Player’s
Guide, so I wouldn’t consider it too spoilery. Thylea is based on ancient Greek mythology
but has its own history and pantheon. You won’t find Zeus, Apollo, or Aphrodite here. The continent of Thylea was home to a number of fey
races, such as nymphs, satyrs, centaurs, and cyclopes. Long ago, the first elves, dwarves, and
humans reached Thylea’s shores, but when they arrived they found their
magic and weapons failed them. They were at the mercy of the fey native inhabitants. Life was short and difficult for these pilgrims. The land was ruled by two great Titans, the Lord of
Storms and his sister-wife, the Lady of Dreams. The desperate mortal settlers began trying to gain
the favor of the Titans through worship and sacrifice, eventually gaining some measure of protection from
the Titans who eventually warmed to their devotion, though life for the humanoids remained arduous. This status quo stayed unchanged for hundreds
of years until the arrival of the Dragonlords. You can think of the Dragonlords
as a high level adventuring party. They arrived from the old world riding bronze dragons. They helped secure and raise settlements,
including the great city of Mytros, fought back roving bands of cyclopes and centaurs, and became symbols of hope for the
long-suffering mortals of Thylea. As you may expect, this devotion
made the Titans jealous, so they raised an army to eradicate
the city of Mytros in retribution. The Dragonlords raised armies of mortals to respond
in kind, and thus the First War was ignited. The native fey races were driven into exile or eradicated. The great bronze dragons of the Dragonlords were slain. When the situation began looking dire for the
mortal races, a miraculous event occurred. Five new gods descended from heaven
to assist the mortals in their war. One of the goddesses, named Mytros, sacrificed
herself to save the city for which she was named. The Dragonlords split their party, half sailing into
the Underworld to confront the Lady of Dreams, and half ascending the tower of
Phraxys, home of the Lord of Storms. No one knows exactly what happened, but signs
of the approaching apocalypse began to subside. Some days later, a black ship sailed into the harbor
carrying the bodies of many of the Dragonlords. Several precious items were on board
the ship, including a piece of parchment on which was written an Oath of Peace, which stated
that the titans had sworn to take no vengeance upon the mortals of Thylea for 500 years,
provided that daily sacrifices would resume and that their temples be maintained. Time passed. The mortal civilization on Thylea flourished. The surviving Dragonlords became
kings and established dynasties. Worship of the five new gods expanded to the point
where the existence of the Titans was nearly forgotten. The Five Gods were indeed benevolent and walked
amongst their people whenever they could. As present day approaches, the end
of the Oath of Peace is at hand. The Oracle has prophesized the Doom of Thylea including the death of the new gods and
the annihilation of the mortal people. Our party of potential heroes is summoned to the
Temple of the Oracle to begin their adventure. The campaign takes place over five
acts in a structured open world. As the players reach certain story milestones,
more of the world is opened up to them. The Player’s Guide here provides instructions
on creating your character, including backstory ideas for each class
to help establish their ties to the world. This is also where you can create your epic path should your game master choose to engage
with this optional system., and she should. As the player’s guide explains, one of the recurring
themes in ancient Greek stories and myths are mortal heroes who are born of gods or
who have other divinity touched origins, heroes such as Hercules, Achilles,
Odysseus, and Theseus. Each player can select one epic path which
will determine their character’s context within the world of Thylea. These paths unlock various parts of the campaign, including special relationships
with important story characters and access to specific magical items which
must be found or possibly reforged. Each epic path includes specific supplementary goals
which can earn that character divine blessings. Let me give you a very brief example. The Dragonslayer epic path involves a tragic backstory
in which a dragon caused something horrific to happen to the young player character, forcing them
to grow up and assume responsibility earlier than they otherwise would. What exactly the dragon did is
up to the player and the GM. The GM knows the identity of the dragon and
the path the player must take to find it, and the character begins the adventure with the
knowledge that the Oracle can start them on that path. The Oracle is the starting point
for each of the player characters and is what brings them together on their adventure. The dragonslayer has a specific set of
goals to achieve throughout the campaign and specific magic items to collect
in order to defeat the dragon. Revealing more about how the epic
paths are used in the campaign may be considered spoilery, so I’ll leave it there. Suffice it to say that the epic paths help
tie each character into the narrative without taking away any of their personal agency. Each path provides a backstory, a list of classic
Greek heroes who inspired the story, possible character restrictions, an
adventure hook, goals, and rewards. There are 8 possible epic paths including The
Cursed One, The Demi-God, The Doomed One, The Dragonslayer, The Gifted One, the Haunted
One, The Lost One, and The Vanished One. There’s also instructions on
creating your own epic path. The epic paths do not replace the regular backgrounds
that a player generally chooses, but enhances it. In addition to the epic paths, several
new playable races are also included. First we have the Thylean Centaur, a
noble, nomadic, and distrustful race. They receive bonuses to strength and wisdom, have a
walking speed of 40 feet, and have the ability to charge, which allows them to deal additional damage if they move 30 feet toward a target
and then hit them with a melee attack. They can also be ridden for a
short time by willing allies. Next we have the Thylean Medusa! As you might expect, they are humanoids
who made a bargain with a dark power which granted them certain fortunes as
well as turning their hair into snakes and giving them the ability to
petrify others with their gaze. They are almost universally despised, so
it’s recommended that they wear big hats to keep their true identity safely under wraps. “Oh, that hissing sound? That’s just my
tea kettle. I keep it under my sun hat.” They get bonuses to dexterity and intelligence. They can make attacks with their snake
hair, potentially poisoning their foes. They gain the ability to petrify at 5th level. The effect is temporary until the creature fails
its saving throw three times in 10 minutes and then it is permanently petrified. The DC on the check increases as the character levels. The Thylean Minotaur is descended from a group of
humans who founded a city long ago called Minos. They did not have the strength necessary to till
the land, so they found a strong and capable bull which they tamed and utilized
to produce bountiful crops. They began to venerate the bull, which
of course angered the Lord of Storms, who cursed the settlers of Minos, turning each of
them into the animal that they loved so much. They eventually became known as minotaurs. While some simply have horns and a snout-like
nose, others have the full upper torso of a bull. They have improved strength and constitution
and are considered medium creatures. They have keen smelling, dark vision, advantage
on checks to solve maze-like puzzles, and can only see the colors red and grey. Starting at 5th level, they can transform themselves into
a full bull using the same rules as a polymorph spell. At level 9, they can instead transform
themselves into a dire bull. The Thylean Nymphs are fey spirits of various
sorts: dryads of the forest, naiads of the rivers, oreads of the mountains, aurae of
the night sky, and nereids of the sea. They mostly live out in nature but can disguise
themselves to walk among humanoids. They have improved charisma and wisdom
and are considered medium creatures. They have proficiency in persuasion and can
cast charm person once per short or long rest. They gain special traits depending
on which subrace they choose. For example, a dryad has advantage
on survival checks in forested areas and gains the ability to cast the goodberry
spell at 3rd level and barkskin at 7th level. The Thylean Satyr have very strong
connections to the Feywild. They have the lower body of a goat
and the upper body of an elf. As you might expect, they are quite hedonistic
and love music, wine, and dancing. They’re found throughout Thylea but are
viewed with suspicion by the other races due to their reputation for seducing and corrupting
the morals of the young and old alike. They gain bonuses to dexterity and charisma. They have fey heritage, proficiency
with musical instruments, and advantage on performances made with them. They can also cast minor illusion, and at 3rd level
they can cast sleep, and at 5th level, suggestion. The Thylean Sirens are a race
of winged, aquatic humanoids who live amongst the rocky shores of the coast. They prefer to not venture too far inland. As in legend, they are known for
their sorrowful, beautiful voices. They experience tempestuous emotions which
are almost always expressed via song. Sirens have bonuses to charisma and dexterity and have advantage on performance and
persuasion checks made with their voices. They have a flying speed of 30 feet. After each short or long rest, the player must
decide if their siren is happy or sad. If they are sad, they lose the ability to
fly but gain the Song of Sorrow ability, which allows them to cast charm person, and at 3rd
level the enthrall spell, and at 5th level, hold person. If happy, they gain the ability to fly
but lose access to those spells. Each core D&D class also gains a new Thylean subclass,
or archetype as they’re known in the book. I’ll just touch on these briefly. The Barbarian gains the Herculean Path, which
is devoted to the idea of tremendous strength. Barbarians on this path are
better at grappling creatures. They’re also adept at ranged weapons, being able to use their strength modifier and
rage bonuses for attacks with longbows. They can even choose to add the thunderwave
effect to ranged attacks once per rest. At 10th level their rage ability increases and at 14th level they can create earthquakes
around them by pounding on the ground. The Bard gains the College of Epic Poetry. A bard of this school begins
their epic poem at third level. They can add a verse to their poem when certain
events occur to your party by chance. A comedic verse can be added when someone
rolls a natural one on an attack or saving throw, an ironic verse when someone fails a saving throw
even after adding a bardic inspiration die, a tragedy when someone falls unconscious, and a verse on hubris when someone rolls
a natural 20 on an attack or saving throw. Some other events can inspire
a verse at your GM’s discretion. Your poem increases in rank as it gains verses, the formula for which changes depending
on the size of your party. As your poem gains ranks, your bardic
inspiration die becomes more powerful. For example, your die will gain a minimum value. If your poem is rank 5, for example, your bardic
inspiration die has a minimum value of 4. If it’s rolled and comes up a number
less than 4, it can be considered a 4. You may also give your die one of 5 special
properties depending on your poem rank, chosen when the die is given. Epic Courage grants advantage on saving throws and Epic Determination grants
advantage on death saving throws. You can also grant Epic Reflexes, Epic
Resistance, and Epic Foresight. Bards of the College of Epic Poetry also gain
proficiency in medium armor at 6th level and at 14th level, your die grants protection
from being knocked unconscious. The Cleric gains the Prophecy Domain,
turning them into oracles. They gain domain spells at certain levels including
detect magic, augury, beacon of hope, dream, and scrying. You can grant allies temporary hit points
when casting divination spells. At second level, they can channel divinity
to go into a trance for 10 minutes. They roll two d20s and record the numbers. And then they can replace any attack roll, saving throw,
or ability check done by them or an ally within range with one of those prophetic rolls, though they
must declare that they’re using this ability before the check is made. You lose the prophecy dice
once the trance has ended. It’s not stated in the book, but it seems like the cleric is
able to take all their regular actions while in this trance. At 6th level, they gain flashes of foresight, which removes concentration requirements
for spells that restore hit points and allows them to use a reaction to cast
beneficial spells to imperiled allies. At 8th level, healing spells become more powerful. And finally at 17th level, their aforementioned
trances become also more powerful. Next is the druid’s Circle of Sacrifice. Druids of this circle believe in the immutable
laws laid down by great universal powers and believe that sacrifices in the form
of bonfires must be made regularly. They can immolate the bodies of foes to grant the
effects of a bless spell to their comrades for a minute. At 6th level they can use sprigs of mistletoe
they’ve collected, represented by d4s, to achieve certain effects, like detecting
magic and casting cure wounds. You can also expend a sprig to roll the d4 and add that number of hit points to
any spell that restores hit points. At 10th level, their mistletoe dice become d6s. They can also tag an enemy for sacrifice, which
allows them certain bonuses against them. At 14th level, the mistletoe dice become d8s and
they gain access to the teleportation circle spell. They can also create permanent teleportation circles
with 8 hours and 12,000 gold pieces of material. The fighter gains the Hoplite Soldier subclass,
which specializes in swords and shields. When wielding a shield, they can use their reaction
to make a melee attack against nearby foes who attack an ally. At 3rd level, they can invoke a shield wall, which gives a
bonus to AC for anyone near an ally wielding a shield and increases the AC for anyone
nearby using a shield themselves. At 7th level, they gain bonuses to attacks
with spears, tridents, and javelins. Their shield defenses become stronger at 10th level and at 15th level their critical hit range increases to 19
and they can knock away shields used by enemies. Finally at 18th level, they can
attack any number of creatures within 5 feet of them using a
single melee attack action. The Monk gains the Way of the Shield, which teaches
that a shield can be used as an extension of the warrior. Monks of the Way of the Shield work well
with or against the Hoplite Soldiers. The monk gains proficiency with shields and the
shield does not impede their other monk abilities. Opportunity attacks made against them while
they hold a shield are done at disadvantage. They are able to use ki points to
make vaulting strikes at 6th level, letting them leap 15 feet in the air and make a landing
strike with advantage and an increased critical range. They can also use the shield to counterattack
foes who strike out and miss them. At 11th level, they can spend a ki point to gain additional
AC from their shield for a short amount of time. And at 17th level, they have advantage on
attacks against huge or larger creatures and can’t be frightened or paralyzed by them. The paladin gains the Oath of the Dragonlord. These paladins long to bind a dragon into
their service as the Dragonlords once did. They summon pseudodragon familiars to help them find
dragon eggs, which they hatch and raise together. The paladin gains new oath spells including
Hunter’s Mark, fly, and haste. It’s expected that your pseudodragon
will find you an egg by 5th level. This paladin gains two new channel divinity abilities too. Dragon’s Wrath lets them frighten others and Scorn the Unworthy lets them knock foes
prone and cause them to lose concentration. The dragon egg will hatch by 7th level, and you can
use an ability to bond with the dragon wyrmling. You can also gain two new spells: Bond of the
Dragonlords and Dirge of the Dragonlords. At 15th level, the dragon becomes a young
dragon and can be used as a mount. And at 20th level, the dragon gains multiattack
features and normal breath weapon recharges. It also gains a legendary resistance
which it can use once per long rest. The ranger can join the Amazonian Conclave, a
warrior culture generally located on an island. There is some Wonder Woman influence here,
but they certainly put their own spin on it. For example, each Amazonian huntress has a
mechanical avian companion called a stimfay that supports them in battle. It’s a matriarchal society, but male Amazonians do exist. They’re just generally not warriors. At 3rd level, the Amazonian ranger
constructs their stimfay. They can be used to scout ahead of the
party and can be used in battle as well. They have their own stat block and attacks, and increase
their hit points and modifiers as the ranger levels. The Amazonian ranger also has its
own catch phrase, or battle cry, that they can yell in battle to enter a
frenzy which works a bit like rage. At 5th level they can reflect missiles with their bracers. They also have a circular blade-like weapon that they
can throw at enemies and which returns to them. At higher levels they can bounce it between enemies. And at 15th level, they gain a stunning strike-like ability. The rogue can become an Odyssean, a legendary trickster who looks a lot like a common
hoplite soldier carrying a spear and shield. They cunningly find weaknesses in their
opponents’ defenses and exploit them. They get their name from their tendency
to travel far and wide seeking adventure. They can attempt to trick one of
their enemies as a bonus action, which gives them and their allies advantage
on attacks against that creature. At 9th level, when intelligent enemies
know you’re there but can’t see you, they become too distracted to
make attacks of opportunity. They later gain bonuses to their initiative and the opportunity to regain hit points
by taking a deep breath before combat, and at 17th level gain the ability to make
a ranged attack against an enemy whenever an ally takes an attack of
opportunity against that same foe. The sorcerer can be of a demigod origin which improves the efficacy of their spells
and makes them extra built and beautiful. They can choose the divine
domain of their godly ancestor which gives them certain spells that they
can cast without using a spell slot. For example, if they choose the death domain,
they can cast bane and ray of sickness. The other domains are knowledge, life,
nature, light, tempest, trickery, and war. They’re also stronger than your average sorcerer, able to add their charisma modifier
instead of their strength modifier to their melee attacks and damage rolls. They can also spend a sorcery point to increase
the effective level of the spells they cast by one. At 14th level, they gain a legendary
resistance once per long rest, and finally at 18th level, they can spend any number
of sorcery points to really pump up their spell’s level. This demigod origin won’t necessarily
work well with the demigod epic path as the epic path assumes your daddy is a particular
god, namely Pythor, the god of battle, though war is one of the domains
that you can choose from. The warlock can have a trio of ancient
hags known as the Fates as their patron. While they are utterly evil, they have granted
you the power to glimpse the future. You have an expanded list of spell options including
planar binding, arcane eye, clairvoyance, and identify. Each morning you can consult the fates, which allows you to cast a divination
spell without expending a spell slot, which also provides you with
some temporary hit points. At 6th level, when you wake up after a rest, you
can also get a glimpse of your fate that day by rolling a d20 and recording the result. You can then use that result to replace any
attack roll, saving throw, or ability check made by you or a creature you can see later that day. You have to choose to do it
before the roll is made though. At 10th level, you feel your burden lifted
when you help a creature meet its fate, regaining a spell slot after bringing
a creature to zero hit points. And finally at 14th level, you can accelerate
the entropic powers of fate, causing a creature to move next
to another creature you can see and suffer psychic damage if they aren’t immediately
next to them at the beginning of their turn. And finally, the wizard can become
an Academy Philosopher. They choose from one of eight philosophic schools,
which grants them particular abilities or bonuses. For example, a student of the school of
empiricism gains proficiency in perception and can cast identify or detect magic
once per rest without using a spell slot. The other schools are cynicism, eclecticism, epicureanism, stoicism, sophism,
hedonism, and skepticism. At 6th level, you can become a master of
mathematics, letting you cast with precision. When you cast a spell that affects
other creatures you can see, you can choose a certain number
of them to automatically succeed on their saving throws against the spell and they take
no damage instead of half damage from the spell. Basically, this will make your fireball even more OP. You can also increase or decrease the
area of effect of your spells by 5 feet. At 10th level, you can gain insight
into the nature of causality, letting you redirect spells cast against
single targets that you can see. And at 14th level, you master your training of paradoxes, helping you maintain concentration on your
spell even when you would otherwise lose it. One other innovation in this book is the idea of fame,
which the heroes earn for performing great deeds. As you become more famous
and revered across the land you gain certain privileges and
others may become jealous. For example, when you gain your first fame point, your name is known in the local taverns in the
region where your first great deed was performed. At 5 points, smaller settlements across the
land have festivals to celebrate your name and you have free lodging in smaller settlements, and
advantage on persuasion checks during festivals. I’ll leave it to you to discover what happens
in your path up to 20 fame points. So we’ve talked about the epic paths, the
new races, the new subclasses, and fame. Most of the book is devoted to the campaign,
which will level you all the way up to 20. I don’t want to give many story
spoilers beyond what I said earlier. The heroes must prepare to confront the Titans
as the Oath of Peace nears its final day. This is a truly epic adventure and one that I plan
to run as soon as I can get a new group together. The campaign can take place in any setting as Thylea can be a standalone continent with
its own pantheon and magical properties. As the book notes, the original Dragonlords
and settlers had to come from somewhere. All that’s known is that they came from a
faraway land with humans and dragons. Hmm… If you are one of those who finds
starting at 1st level a bit dull, the book also gives you instructions
on starting at 5th level. And there are certain NPCs who can join the party if you’re running the game with
a smaller number of players. These NPCs can be controlled by the players. The book also contains a ton of new monsters,
magic items, weapons, and spells for you and your players to discover. There’s an appendix that’s ten pages long just
detailing some interesting random encounters that your party may experience in their adventure. Some of the encounters are marked as “special.” They’re more complex and can
have major story implications, so you have to be a bit careful in how you add them in. Many of the random encounters are
designed to be light-hearted in nature to break up the tension if the party has been engaged
in a lot of high-stakes adventuring lately. The book also provides instructions on how the
players can become a Dragonlord themselves if they choose to, including finding
and hatching a dragon egg, and raising and training a dragon companion. And finally, if the player characters overcome all of
the trials put before them in this epic adventure, they can seek to ascend to godhood themselves. Finally, there is also a chapter devoted to handouts including a single page world primer and six
documents that can be copied from the book or printed from the PDF to give your
players at the appropriate time. The Player’s Guide is softcover
and about 60 pages long. Chapter 1 provides lore about the history of the world, and the various factions and kingdoms present on
Thylea, and the laws and mythology of the land. Chapter 2 helps with character creation, including
providing a list of appropriate names and an overview of the various epic paths. It also has a page which gives your players inspiration
for backstories for all the basic classes. For example, a bard could be a
satyr minstrel who travels the land and performs in smoky taverns of human towns or
forest glades for nymphs and other fey creatues. Or maybe the bard is a student from the Academy in
the city of Mytros who learned from the masters there. Chapter 3 details the new playable races and
chapter 4 the new subclasses, or archetypes, plus the new spells provided in the adventure. The rest of the book details more information about
the world and the concept of mythic heroism. The Player’s Guide provides a tad more information than
I would feel comfortable giving to the players, honestly. For instance, they’ll learn what they
can get at each level of fame, when I’d kind of prefer to let them discover that
for themselves organically in the adventure. But for the most part, it’s a very useful tool. Pathfinder often includes such player guides,
and I think they’re a wonderful opportunity to help the players become more invested
in their world even before the campaign begins. Let’s take a look at the Odyssey
of the Dragonlords GM screen. Due to some limitations at their
printer, the dimensions of it are a little bit different than your
standard D&D GM screens. It’s 8½ inches tall, just like the official screens. The two interior panels are landscape
oriented and they’re 8½ x 11 inches. The two external panels, however,
aren’t as wide as normal. They’re about 6½ inches wide instead of 11. It’s not a big deal but worth noting. On the inside, we have a map of the Thylean
heartlands and a list of Thylean deities here on the first panel. The second panel lists our usual 5e conditions. The third panel has random encounter
tables that can be cross referenced with the corresponding appendix in the book. I would love to see some page numbers on these
to make it easier to find them when needed, but it’s great to have. There’s also the Thylean names
list, a timeline of Thylean history, and a list of the corresponding
constellations and destinations that go with the map on last panel of the screen. Now you may be wondering, “What
is this constellation thing all about?” Well, there are seventeen constellations and each one leads to one of the islands
in the Cerulean Gulf and Forgotten Sea. Each island of course can be visited and has
a section in the book that talks about it and what happens when the characters arrive. They also provide these handouts, which can be handed
to the players when they arrive at each location to give them a sense of the geography. They aren’t labeled, so you’re going to have
to match them to the pictures in the book. There’s also one more, one here, that
shows you the Thylean Heartlands. Finally, we have our maps. There are three 24 x 30 inch paper poster maps. First we have the Thylea world map, and on the
back here we have a map of the Nether Sea. Next is a map of the City of Estoria, and
on the back a map of the City of Mytros. And finally we have a map of the
City of Aresia, and on the back… we have another map of Thylea, but this one shows
the state of the world at the end of the campaign when the Apokalypsis begins. Ever wanted to have an encounter with a Tarrasque? Now’s your chance. Welcome back to the people who skipped over spoilers. First, I want to preface this by saying that I
haven’t read through the entire campaign but everything I’ve looked through
so far has me really excited. The epic paths are a fantastic method of threading
each character’s personal motivations into the overall narrative. Each character will have their own path,
or on rare occasions, they may share one. In the campaign text, there will be a little box that will
appear anytime an epic path moment may occur. For example, if an NPC has something specific
to tell a character, say on the Gifted One path, there will be a little note reminding you so you
don’t have to track all of that information yourself and potentially miss something. Now the art budget for this book must
have been really enormous because there’s just gorgeous art on every page or a really
nicely designed battle map that you can use almost every other page. And the new subraces are really flavorful and fun. There’s quite a few fey options here. I’m particularly interested in
playing as a medusa or a siren. Grady suggested to me that the subclasses may be
a bit overpowered compared to the official ones, which may be true—I’m not really
a great judge of these things— but they’re wonderfully thematic. The Amazonian Conclave is the first subclass
that made me interested in playing as a ranger. You get to be Wonder Woman with a mechanical hawk! The Epic Poetry bard also seems really fun, especially if
you can get your player to actually write some verses. The Prophecy Domain cleric
and the Fates Patron warlock share some thematic and mechanical elements, but both seem to mesh really well with the setting and
provide you with some fun powers for the player. The fortune telling mechanic gives the player a bit
more control over the randomness of the game and an opportunity for some fun story telling. I also appreciate the synergies between the Hoplite Soldier fighter, the Way of the
Shield monk, and the Odyssean rogue, all of which help bring those shields
into the forefront of battle. The fame mechanic is really awesome. It allows you to easily have the world
react to the character’s actions, so they feel like their accomplishments
are appreciated and impactful. I try to do that in my regular campaigns, but having
it structured out here is a really great boon. Finally, all the extra doodads like the maps,
and the handouts, and the GM screen aren’t necessary to enjoy the
adventure but they certainly liven up the experience and help streamline things. The Player’s Guide is a fantastic way of getting your
players up to speed and invested in the adventure. You’ll have to pass it from player to
player prior to starting the campaign, but you’ll also have access to the
PDF if you want to send it digitally. The whole package is extremely well done
and you can tell that a lot of love went into it. I highly recommend trying it out. I’ll report back to you once I get my campaign going. Speaking of which, If you’re interested in
picking up Odyssey of the Dragonlords, you can purchase it at the link in the
description below the video here. You can get the adventure book as a hardcover
here for about 40 British pounds or in PDF digital form for £20. You can get the softcover Player’s Guide
for £10, or the PDF version for free. There’s also a bundle available which includes the
adventure book, the Player’s Guide, the GM screen, 5 large double-sided maps, 12 smaller single-sided
maps, plus the three Odyssey posters for £65. They include the PDF with any physical book purchase. Finally they have the double-sided
map of Thylea and Mytros for £5 and a free PDF version of the character sheet. The adventure is also available on Roll20 for $50 [USD] and Fantasy Grounds for $40 if you prefer to play online. And they have a dedicated Discord channel
if you plan to run the adventure and want to consult with some other
game masters along the way. It’s a pretty amazing set, and I’m curious how it’ll compare to the Mythic
Odysseys of Theros book when it comes out. This book will have the benefit of including
a full 1 to 20 adventure though, while the other one is just a campaign setting book. Getting an adventure that actually levels
you all the way to 20 is fairly rare as well. So let me know what you think
in the comments section below. We also don’t frequently cover books
like this on the channel so thanks for watching all the way
through to the end of this video. Let me know if you’d like to see more coverage like this. We have quite a few supplements and adventure books
on our shelves that we could review if there’s demand. We want to thank our sponsor
for this video, The Deck of Many. If you subscribe to their Patreon, you can
receive new reference cards each month as well as their newest creation, the Big Bad Booklet, which includes everything you need
to drop an epic and creative encounter with a boss monster into your
regular ongoing campaign. Each set comes with the booklet
for that month’s monster plus a 4 x 6 piece of art for the monster to
show your players, and 10 reference cards. For March 2020 they have Miss Speckleback, a giant
frog monster who eats her own magical eggs, as well as any interloping
adventurers who cross her path. The booklet contains her backstory,
possible adventure hooks, stat blocks, role playing information, tactics, and more. It’s quite a bit of information really and leads to
some really creative stories for your game table. Get a new one each month at BigBadBooklet.com Thanks for watching today! If you enjoyed the video, kindly click that
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me feedback in the comments section below. I hope you’re doing well and I’ll see
you next time at the Gallant Goblin.

6 thoughts to “Odyssey of the Dragonlords D&D 5e Campaign & Setting Review – Arcanum Worlds”

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