Group Policy Types and components

Group Policy Types and components


In this video from ITFreeTraining I will look
at the different Group Policy types, of which there are 3. Understanding what these are
used for will help you later on in the course when more advanced topics are covered. The 3 group policy types are, local, NonLocal
and starter. Local GPOs (GPO stands for Group Policy Object) are Group Policies that apply
to the local computer only. These are also referred to as LGPO which stands for Local
Group Policy Object. NonLocal GPOs are essentially Group Policies
that are stored in Active Directory and deployed to computers in the domain. Starter GPOs are essentially a GPO template
that you can use to create other GPOs. Let’s have a look at each one in more detail. Local Group Policy applies only to the local
computer. The advantage of local Group Policy is that the computer does not need to be in
the domain. This means there is no central control so the administrator will need to
visit each computer in order to apply Group Policy. To make the process easier, once a
computer has been configured, the administrator can export the Group Policy and import it
on another computer. After Windows 2008 R2 and Windows Vista, multiple
local Group Polices are supported. However, the additional group policies can be applied
only to users. It is not possible to create multiple local Group Policies for the same
computer. To have a look at the local group policy on
this computer, I will right click on the start menu and then select run from the menu. If
I enter in GPEdit.MSC, this will run the local Group Policy editor. You can also add it in
an MMC console. To do this, I will run MMC from the run menu. Once MMC has started, I will run “Add/Remove
Snap-in” from the file menu. From the available snap-ins I will select “Group Policy Object
Editor”. Since I have RSAT installed on this computer, there are also additional Group
Policy Snap-ins that would not normally be present, but “Group Policy Object Editor”
will always be present. Once I press add, the snap-in will be added
and I will be asked which local Group Policy I want to edit. By default, you can see that
the Group Policy is configured to edit the Local Computer. If I press the browse button,
I get the option to change the computer that I want to edit. If I select the Users tab, I can select which
user’s Group Policy I want to edit. Currently there are no additional Local Group Polices.
If you wanted to, you could create a Group Policy for just administrators and another
one just for “Non-Administrators”. I will now exit out of this screen and add
Group Policy Object Editor to MMC. Once added, notice that I can expand and see all the Local
Group Policy settings that can be configured. In later videos I will have a look at how
to configure some of these settings. The next Group Policy type is NonLocal GPOs.
This is Group Policy which is stored in Active Directory. Since it is stored in Active Directory
it is replicated to all other Domain Controllers. This makes it easy for the administrator to
control and deploy Group Policy in their domain. For this to occur, each computer needs to
be a member of the domain. The advantage of NonLocal GPOs, which I will
often just refer to as Group Policy, is that multiple Group Policies can be applied. There
is an order in which they are applied so that when conflicts occur there is a predictable
way that the settings are applied. In a later video, I will go through the order that they
are applied in. These multiple group policies can be applied
to both users and computers. NonLocal GPOs provide the easiest way for the administrator
to manage computers and users in the domain. The last Group Policy type is Starter GPOs.
These were introduced in Windows Server 2008. These are essentially a template of Group
Policy settings. When a new NonLocal GPO is created, you have the option to create the
Group Policy Object from the starter GPO. This new Group Policy Object will start with
all the settings from the starter GPO. The administrator is free to change any of these
settings as they see fit. That covers it for all the different types
of Group Policy supported by Windows. I hope you have found this video useful and I hope
to see you in other videos from us. Until next time, thanks for watching.

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